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Kent State's Institute for Applied Linguistics Hosts Translation Studies Scholar Lawrence Venuti, Nov. 15

Posted Nov. 11, 2013
enter photo description
Lawrence Venuti, a leading translation
studies scholar, will speak at the fourth
annual Gregory M. Shreve Lecture Series
at Kent State University on Nov. 15.

Kent State University’s Institute for Applied Linguistics will host Lawrence Venuti, a leading translation studies scholar, during the fourth annual Gregory M. Shreve Lecture Series. Venuti will speak about the genealogies of translation theory on Friday, Nov. 15, at 4 p.m. in the Moulton Hall Ballroom. This event is free and open to the public.

“The annual Shreve Lecture Series recognizes the legacy of Greg Shreve, the founder of the Institute for Applied Linguistics, and brings internationally renowned translation studies scholars to present cutting-edge research to graduate students and faculty,” says Françoise Massardier-Kenney, director of Kent State’s Institute for Applied Linguistics. “A recent external report said that Kent State has the premiere translator training program and translation research group in the U.S., and as such, we are committed to bringing speakers who have a high impact on the discipline.” 

Venuti, professor of English at Temple University, is a translation theorist and historian, as well as someone who can translate from Italian, French and Catalan. He is the author of The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation, The Scandals of Translation: Towards an Ethics of Difference, and Translation Changes Everything: Theory and Practice, as well as the editor of The Translation Studies Reader, an anthology of theory and commentary from antiquity to the present. His translations include Antonia Pozzi’s Breath: Poems and Letters, the anthology Italy: A Traveler’s Literary Companion, Massimo Carlotto’s crime novel The Goodbye Kiss, I.U. Tarchetti’s Fantastic Tales and Ernest Farrés’s Edward Hopper: Poems, for which he won the Robert Fagles Translation Prize. 

The Gregory M. Shreve Lecture Series is made possible through the generosity of Kent State alumni, faculty members and friends of the Institute for Applied Linguistics at Kent State. 

For more information about the event, please contact Massardier-Kenney at fkenney@kent.edu.

For more information about Kent State’s Institute of Applied Linguistics, visit http://appling.kent.edu.